Caribbean

CARICOM countries need to prepare for fallout of US and Iran situation

A suggestion that CARICOM heads meet as soon as possible, and come up with a strategy to deal with any possible fallout or dangerous scenarios, resulting from the recent détente between the United States and Iran.

It comes from Strategic Security Consultant and former Director of the National Operations Centre, Commander Garvin Heerah, who says Trinidad and Tobago should take the lead on this.

He warns that countries around the world where US interests are located have now been made more vulnerable, as a result of the current situation between Washington and Tehran.

Scotiabank and Visa team up on regional digital payments project

Scotiabank and Visa have announced the signing of a seven-year agreement to support the development of innovative payment solutions and enhancing the customer experience for Visa cardholders in Central America and the Caribbean.

According to an official statement, the relationship will leverage Visa’s technology solutions and know-how to support Scotiabank’s digital transformation across different markets in Central America and the Caribbean.

PANCAP fully endorses PrEP and urges Member States to implement it

The Pan Caribbean Partnership against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP) is urging Member States to implement use of Pre-exposure prophylaxis  (PrEP) medication in their health systems, to help reduce risk of HIV infection in their populations.

In an official statement issued today, PANCAP fully endorsed the World Health Organisation’s  (WHO)  recommendation  that  Pre  Exposure  Prophylaxis  (PrEP) be offered to all population groups at substantial risk of becoming infected with HIV in order to prevent the acquisition of HIV.

TT students get a “Brighter View”

Some 3,000 students across Trinidad and Tobago have benefitted from a special initiative that provides free vision screening and testing and spectacles.

The Brighter View initiative, carried out by Courts Optical, was launched in 2017 in Trinidad as a wider part of Unicomer’s Corporate Social Responsibility Programme.   It was then expanded to the wider Caribbean region to the tune of USD$50K and has reached the islands of  Jamaica, Guyana, St Lucia, St Vincent, Grenada, Dominica, Antigua, St Kitts and Belize last year. 

Rowley not among 5 Caribbean leaders to meet with Trump Friday

The White House says President Donald Trump will meet with leaders of five Caribbean nations on Friday in an effort to strengthen cooperation on security and trade issues.

Trinidad and Tobago will not be represented at that meeting.

The meeting at Mar-a-Lago, the president's resort in Palm Beach, will feature the leaders of the Bahamas, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica and Saint Lucia.

Press Secretary Sarah Sanders says Trump will use the meeting to thank the leaders for their support for peace and democracy in Venezuela.

Region officially declared Zika free

The Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) has announced that the World Health Organization (WHO) has removed its Zika virus country classification scheme, which categorized most of the Caribbean territories as having active Zika virus transmission. 
 
This removal by the WHO comes on the heels of data released by CARPHA, giving evidence that the Zika virus transmission in the Caribbean had been interrupted for over 12 months, or was at undetectable levels, thereby posing very little risk to residents and visitors to the region. 

Anthony Sabga Caribbean Awards celebrates 10th ceremony in Jamaica

Four laureates including Jamaican writer, Kei Miller, were inducted by the Anthony N Sabga Caribbean Awards for Excellence at its first awards ceremony to be staged in Jamaica on Saturday night at the Pegasus hotel.

The ceremony also included a performance by famed Jamaican singer Tessanne Chin who rendered her song Try.

The Caribbean Awards have been in existence since 2005, and this was its tenth ceremony. The programme was initiated by the late Trinidadian entrepreneur Dr Anthony N Sabga in 2005.

Britain's PM apologises to Caribbean leaders for Windrush controversy

British Prime Minister Theresa May has apologised to Caribbean leaders over the Windrush generation controversy, at a Downing Street meeting.

She said she was "genuinely sorry" about the anxiety caused by the Home Office threatening the children of Commonwealth citizens with deportation.

The UK government "valued" the contribution they had made, she said, and they had a right to stay in the UK.

It comes amid reports some are still facing deportation.

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