Fuel

Unipet shutdown affects thousands

Thou­sands of dri­vers were af­fect­ed yes­ter­day as Unipet’s 21 ser­vice sta­tions across the coun­try re­mained closed when deal­ers sought to send a mes­sage to the Gov­ern­ment that the prof­its they were mak­ing were way too low for them to con­sid­er stay­ing in busi­ness.

The clo­sure of the sta­tions led to pres­sure on the 100-plus NP ser­vice sta­tions that re­mained open as work­ers at those sta­tions found them­selves flood­ed with more ve­hi­cles than they usu­al­ly catered for daily.

Challenges to UNIPET fuel supply network today

Chief Executive Officer of UNIPET, Dexter Riley, says their fuel supply network may be affected today, to some extent.

Mr Riley told us UNIPET is having a challenge with their supplies for today and for much of this week, and that consumers can expect one or two hiccups purchasing gas.

The UNIPET CEO did not confirm whether petroleum dealers will meet today with industry regulators. However, sources indicate such a meeting is scheduled to take place at some point, today.

Kamla: Threat to T&T's fuel supply

Is there a short­age of fu­el? Will there be an in­crease in the price of fu­el?

Op­po­si­tion Leader Kam­la Per­sad-Bisses­sar raised these ques­tions at the Unit­ed Na­tion­al Con­gress Mon­day night meet­ing in Fyz­abad based on a doc­u­ment left in her mail­box. The let­ter by chair­man of Trinidad Pe­tro­le­um Hold­ings Lim­it­ed Wil­fred Es­pinet to En­er­gy Min­is­ter Franklin Khan was about a month­ly short­fall of US$20 mil­lion to pur­chase re­fined fu­el to sup­ply the coun­try.

Khan: Don’t blame gas for car fires

Paria Fu­el Trad­ing’s gas has met – and in many cas­es – ex­ceed­ed the con­trac­tu­al spec­i­fi­ca­tion, says En­er­gy Min­is­ter Franklin Khan, as he de­fend­ed the fu­el qual­i­ty.

Re­ply­ing to Op­po­si­tion queries in Par­lia­ment on Mon­day, Khan struck down con­cerns that the qual­i­ty of gas might be re­spon­si­ble for fires which start­ed in sev­er­al cars.

MHTL: Big savings if methanol used as fuel additive

Gaso­line and diesel prices could go down if T&T de­cides to use methanol as five per cent its fu­el mix­ture.

This was re­vealed by Vishard Chan­dool, man­ag­er tech­ni­cal and cor­po­rate ser­vices Methanol Hold­ings Trinidad Ltd, who told a methanol con­fer­ence yes­ter­day that the coun­try could save as much as a quar­ter bil­lion dol­lars on an an­nu­al ba­sis if the coun­try de­cides to blend five per cent of its fu­el with methanol.

This sav­ings, he said, can then be passed on­to mo­torists.

Fuel suppliers demand up front payment

State-owned Paria Fu­el Trad­ing Com­pa­ny could be on a col­li­sion course with the Gov­ern­ment and State-en­ter­prise Na­tion­al Pe­tro­le­um Mar­ket­ing Com­pa­ny Lim­it­ed as it is in­sist­ing it must get time­ly pay­ments from the Min­istry of Fi­nance for the fu­el sub­sidy and wants NP to pay for its fu­el on time.

No more regular gas on the market, fishermen threaten protests

Fish­er­men are plan­ning to protest out­side the Of­fice of the Prime Min­is­ter next week be­cause reg­u­lar gas is no longer avail­able in the coun­try.

Vice pres­i­dent of the Clax­ton Bay Fish­ing As­so­ci­a­tion Bhadase Sook­nanan warned that with­out reg­u­lar gas, the fu­el used in the out­board en­gines of their boats, the lo­cal fish­ing in­dus­try will be oblit­er­at­ed. Sook­nanan, who owns two boats and em­ploys five peo­ple, said he used to spend $200 on gas for one fish­ing trip but that cost will in­crease to $500.

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