health

Bravo to bring sanitary napkins machine to T&T

Trinbago Knight Riders cricketer Dwayne Bravo is working to bring far more than sport and singing entertainment to Trinidad and Tobago soon.

The former national captain is working with an Indian businessman, to produce sanitary napkins for women right here in T&T.

Bravo, who played for the Chennai Super Kings in the Indian Premier League, on Wednesday met with Indian businessman Arunachalam Muruganantham in Coimbatore, India, to discuss the initiative.

Muruganantham is known for introducing affordable sanitary napkins in the Indian market.

UTT evacuated as insecticide causes sickness

The University of Trinidad & Tobago O'Meara campus was evacuated after an insecticide, which was sprayed on the premises this morning, made staff unwell.

Deputy Chairman of UniversityProfessor Clement Imbert confirmed the evacuation took place to Guardian Media.

Health and Safety officers order the campus be evacuated after several members of staff complained about feeling nauseous.

The scent was said to be overpowering.

Guardian Media was told it seemed like insecticide was coming through the air conditioning vents 

The campus was cleared by 10am.

Shot spiritual leader still hospitalised

The 37-year-old spir­i­tu­al leader who was shot mul­ti­ple times at his San­ta Flo­ra home on Tues­day is still ward­ed in a se­ri­ous con­di­tion at the San Fer­nan­do Gen­er­al Hos­pi­tal but he has shown some im­prove­ment.

Rel­a­tives of Anil “Ba­ba Anil” Jaimun­gal, 37, who were at the hos­pi­tal yes­ter­day said they were clue­less as to why some­one would want to harm or kill him.

Po­lice said around 11.45 am Jaimun­gal was with his 58-year-old moth­er un­der a shed in front of their home at Syn­cline Road when they saw a man walk­ing to­wards the house.

Haematologist: Venezuelans not eligible to donate blood for one year

Deputy Dean of Grad­u­ate Stud­ies and Re­search Con­sul­tant Haema­tol­o­gist Dr Ken­neth Charles has ad­mit­ted that Venezue­lans who come to T&T to work would not be el­i­gi­ble to do­nate blood for one year.

Charles, a se­nior lec­tur­er, made the com­ment on Tues­day at his Er­ic Williams Med­ical Sci­ences Com­plex, Mt Hope, of­fice in re­sponse to a T&T Guardian ar­ti­cle pub­lished last Fri­day head­lined “Venezue­lans can give blood too- NCRHA head.”

NCRHA head: Venezuelans can give blood too

Chief ex­ec­u­tive of­fi­cer of the North Cen­tral Re­gion­al Health Au­thor­i­ty (NCRHA) Dalvin Thomas has said that Venezue­lan na­tion­als can do­nate blood to the Blood Bank.

He said, how­ev­er, the blood will be test­ed.

He made the state­ment at yes­ter­day’s World Blood Donor Day sym­po­sium host­ed by the Uni­ver­si­ty of the West In­dies Fac­ul­ty of Med­ical Sci­ences, in col­lab­o­ra­tion with North Cen­tral Re­gion­al Health Au­thor­i­ty.

New hope for cancer patients

The fu­ture looked grim for Ami­ra Ba­boolal. 

With four tu­mours grow­ing near crit­i­cal parts of her liv­er, it would have been risky per­form­ing an­oth­er open surgery in un­der two years.

But with­in 24 hours af­ter the 61-year-old can­cer war­rior was wheeled in­to the the­atre at the South­ern Med­ical Clin­ic in San Fer­nan­do on Mon­day, she was on her way home with the tu­mours burned dead.

Pages