Venezuela

Ghana willing to help with migrant crisis

Prime Min­is­ter Dr Kei­th Row­ley has ad­mit­ted that Venezuela’s on­go­ing eco­nom­ic and po­lit­i­cal tur­moil has been im­pact­ing T&T and the wider re­gion.

Row­ley made the com­ment at a press con­fer­ence yes­ter­day at the Diplo­mat­ic Cen­tre, St Ann’s, in the pres­ence of Ghana Pres­i­dent Nana Ad­do Dankwa Aku­fo-Ad­do who vis­it­ed our coun­try with a del­e­ga­tion on Wednes­day night and left on Thurs­day night.

Pregnant women, newborn children caught in registration rush

As thousands of Venezuelan migrants rush to register ahead of Friday's deadline, there were calls for more compassion to be shown toward newborn babies and pregnant women who were being pushed to the back of the line in the humid weather.

Mothers with babies just weeks old were told at about 9 am that there were 350 migrants inside the Achievors Banquet Hall in Duncan Village, San Fernando waiting to be registered as part of government's amnesty programme.

Young: Registration process not a doorway to citizenship

No T&T per­ma­nent res­i­den­cy or cit­i­zen­ship for Venezue­lan reg­is­tra­tion ap­pli­cants, says Na­tion­al Se­cu­ri­ty Min­is­ter Stu­art Young.

He was re­spond­ing to re­marks by the Venezue­lan Am­bas­sador Car­los Perez that reg­is­trants may have a chance for per­ma­nent res­i­dence or cit­i­zen­ship with the cur­rent reg­is­tra­tion dri­ve.

Young al­so re­spond­ed sim­i­lar­ly when queried on the mat­ter by the Op­po­si­tion in Par­lia­ment on Mon­day.

Slow registration of asylum seekers in Tobago

On day one of the reg­is­tra­tion process to grant Venezue­lan asy­lum seek­ers amnesty, on­ly a few turned up at the To­ba­go cen­tre lo­cat­ed at Car­o­line Build­ing, 36 Wil­son Road, Scar­bor­ough.

One of them, Au­drey Hen­der­son, who has been liv­ing and work­ing in To­ba­go for the past 18 months was among the first to ar­rive. He said pri­or to the eco­nom­ic cri­sis in Venezuela he lived a " good life" as a sailor.

Venezue­lan mom ekes out liv­ing af­ter 5 months, surviving on Trini goodwill

As the boat that brought her to Trinidad and To­ba­go neared the shore at Ce­dros, “op­por­tu­ni­ty” was on the mind of Mar­garet Ebjeh. A 37-year-old moth­er of four, this Venezue­lan mi­grant’s im­me­di­ate fu­ture now hinges on the Gov­ern­ment’s mi­grant amnesty pol­i­cy which be­gins on Fri­day. Not on­ly will she be able to work legal­ly in this coun­try for a year af­ter com­plet­ing the process, but Ebjeh will fi­nal­ly be able to vis­it her four chil­dren back in Venezuela and re­turn to T&T with­out a hic­cup.

Ordaz family looks for work

Day-af­ter-day, the Or­daz fam­i­ly, who set­tled in Pe­nal af­ter flee­ing Venezuela, go in search of work.

They were among 105 peo­ple who were ar­rest­ed by the po­lice af­ter be­ing found in the forests near Pa­lo Seco last week.

Since they were grant­ed Or­ders of Su­per­vi­sion no­tices by the Im­mi­gra­tion Di­vi­sion, they have been try­ing to earn a liv­ing.

They sell cake and arepas to earn mon­ey to pay a $3,000 rent for a house they oc­cu­py at Morne Di­a­blo.

Sev­en­teen of them live in the house.

Refugee pleads: Help find my family

A Venezue­lan refugee who had six rel­a­tives aboard a pirogue which dis­ap­peared on May 16 with 29 pas­sen­gers which left Güiria for Ch­aguara­mas is plead­ing for au­thor­i­ties in T&T and Venezuela to lo­cate them.

Kender Berra, who has been liv­ing in this coun­try for more than a year, be­lieves the miss­ing pirogue Ana María was hi­jacked.

Berra, who is orig­i­nal­ly from El Ti­gre, An­zoátegui state, told a Venezue­lan news out­let he and his broth­er wait­ed in vain on a wharf in Ch­aguara­mas for the ves­sel to ar­rive.

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