Venezuela

Slow registration of asylum seekers in Tobago

On day one of the reg­is­tra­tion process to grant Venezue­lan asy­lum seek­ers amnesty, on­ly a few turned up at the To­ba­go cen­tre lo­cat­ed at Car­o­line Build­ing, 36 Wil­son Road, Scar­bor­ough.

One of them, Au­drey Hen­der­son, who has been liv­ing and work­ing in To­ba­go for the past 18 months was among the first to ar­rive. He said pri­or to the eco­nom­ic cri­sis in Venezuela he lived a " good life" as a sailor.

Venezue­lan mom ekes out liv­ing af­ter 5 months, surviving on Trini goodwill

As the boat that brought her to Trinidad and To­ba­go neared the shore at Ce­dros, “op­por­tu­ni­ty” was on the mind of Mar­garet Ebjeh. A 37-year-old moth­er of four, this Venezue­lan mi­grant’s im­me­di­ate fu­ture now hinges on the Gov­ern­ment’s mi­grant amnesty pol­i­cy which be­gins on Fri­day. Not on­ly will she be able to work legal­ly in this coun­try for a year af­ter com­plet­ing the process, but Ebjeh will fi­nal­ly be able to vis­it her four chil­dren back in Venezuela and re­turn to T&T with­out a hic­cup.

Ordaz family looks for work

Day-af­ter-day, the Or­daz fam­i­ly, who set­tled in Pe­nal af­ter flee­ing Venezuela, go in search of work.

They were among 105 peo­ple who were ar­rest­ed by the po­lice af­ter be­ing found in the forests near Pa­lo Seco last week.

Since they were grant­ed Or­ders of Su­per­vi­sion no­tices by the Im­mi­gra­tion Di­vi­sion, they have been try­ing to earn a liv­ing.

They sell cake and arepas to earn mon­ey to pay a $3,000 rent for a house they oc­cu­py at Morne Di­a­blo.

Sev­en­teen of them live in the house.

Refugee pleads: Help find my family

A Venezue­lan refugee who had six rel­a­tives aboard a pirogue which dis­ap­peared on May 16 with 29 pas­sen­gers which left Güiria for Ch­aguara­mas is plead­ing for au­thor­i­ties in T&T and Venezuela to lo­cate them.

Kender Berra, who has been liv­ing in this coun­try for more than a year, be­lieves the miss­ing pirogue Ana María was hi­jacked.

Berra, who is orig­i­nal­ly from El Ti­gre, An­zoátegui state, told a Venezue­lan news out­let he and his broth­er wait­ed in vain on a wharf in Ch­aguara­mas for the ves­sel to ar­rive.

$123,000 in fines imposed against migrants

In two days, a to­tal of 47 Venezue­lans ap­peared in the San Fer­nan­do Mag­is­trates Court for il­le­gal­ly en­ter­ing the coun­try. The ma­jor­i­ty have been slapped with fines to­tal­ly $123,000.

Twen­ty-two ap­peared on Mon­day, 19 were fined a to­tal of $57,000 and three were dis­charged. On Wednes­day, 25 Venezue­lans, in­clud­ing six women, plead­ed guilty be­fore First Court Se­nior Mag­is­trate Jo-Anne Con­nor.

They ad­mit­ted to en­ter­ing the coun­try at a port of en­try which is not des­ig­nat­ed port and fail­ing to re­port to an im­mi­gra­tion of­fi­cer.

US in­tel­li­gence ex­pert on Venezuela cri­sis: Stop all cash inflows immediately

In or­der to force em­bat­tled Venezue­lan Pres­i­dent Nico­las Maduro to act to defuse the cur­rent sit­u­a­tion af­fect­ing the south-Amer­i­can na­tion, which has led to mil­lions of cit­i­zens flee­ing the coun­try, a US in­tel­li­gence ex­pert is rec­om­mend­ing that all cash in­flows to Venezuela be stopped im­me­di­ate­ly.

In ad­di­tion, he said an­oth­er sign of good faith by Maduro would be the im­me­di­ate re­lease of close to 800 po­lit­i­cal pris­on­ers.

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